Kanye West For President In 2020?

It seems apparent these days that Americans are getting more and more fed up with the typical presidential candidate. With the rise in the polls of eccentric billionaire Donald Trump on the Right, and socialist Bernie Sanders on the Left, evidence sure looks like people are searching for an alternative choice in this two-party system that seems to only accomplish gridlock and frustration in Washington and beyond.

Enter Kanye West, eccentric hip-hop producer and fashion mogul who claims he is definitely not an agent of the Illuminati (but everyone knows that is totally what the Illuminati wants us to think), who dropped either a pretty good joke or a massive truth-bomb at the VMAs on Sunday when he said he plans on running for president in 2020. It came at the end of a rambling, 13-minute speech.

The announcement sparked either good natured jokes or sincere hopes that Yeezy will attempt to run for the highest office in the land. For instance, the Democratic National Committee gave their approval of a Kanye presidential bid via Twitter.

On the other side of the political spectrum, someone on the Right thinks Kanye would be a pretty decent Republican candidate, and has started a Ready For Kanye Super PAC. In that interview with Rolling Stone, Baltimore native Eugene Craig says “If he does it, he does it. I just hope that if he does do it, he does it as a Republican.”

He went on to explain why Kanye would be an ideal Republican presidential candidate:

First, it’s an opportunity to reach voters who ordinarily would not be in tune to the process, who are apathetic to the process. The second part of this is that a party that can openly accept Donald Trump has room for Kanye West. Donald Trump is shrinking the party — I’m a member of the Republican Party — and Kanye West brought us an opportunity to actually grow it. Thirdly, we have a gentleman in Mr. West who 1) stands for small business and entrepreneurship, has spoke out against corporatism; 2) is a school choicer, and has spoken about the racial disparities in regards to public school systems; and 3) has openly spoken out against the war on drugs and the pipeline that the war on drugs provides to the private prison systems. I think if you were to put those issues on a piece of paper and say, “What kind of candidate is that?” that sounds like a Republican candidate to me.

We are through the looking glass now people.